Significant cases you ought to know

Each case takes less than two minutes to read.
These two minutes will allow you to get better grades in your law classes.

Cases

The most meaningful cases

They became milestones in the Courts of England and Wales

Wright v Gibbons
Joint tenancy, real property, three joint tenants, two tenants cross-transferring. This is a story of three sisters who collectively owned real estate. Two of them reassigned their possession to each other so that the rental fee could become a common lease. When they died, the third sister tried to refute their assumption, stating that the co-rent lasted. But, the High Court ruled against her.
Wright v Gibbons
Year
1949
Author
In-house law experts
Published
13 May 2019
Wright v Lodge & Shepherd
Law of tort, liability, dangerous driving, negligence, contribution. Mr Lodge was driving his truck in a dangerous way and lost control over his vehicle. He injured Mr Wright, caused the death of one more person, and hit Ms Shepard’s Mini. Mr Lodge claimed that Ms Shepard was liable as well for the accident, as her car stood in the wrong place. The Court held that Ms Shepard should compensate only 10% of expenditures and only to her passenger.
Wright v Lodge & Shepherd
Year
1993
Author
In-house law experts
Published
07 January 2018
Yip Chiu Cheung v Regina
Mens rea, drug trafficking, conspiracy, criminal attempts. The appellant was accused of conspiracy with the intention of illegally trading drugs. The undercover officer was involved in the operation. Even though there is no doubt that the undercover officer had the best intentions and had no mens rea, the Court stated that the Crown cannot administrate and give sanctions to crimes.
Yip Chiu Cheung v Regina
Year
1994
Author
In-house law experts
Published
19 July 2018
Yianni v Edwin Evans and Sons
Duty of care, tort law, negligence. The complainants agreed on a loan when appraisers completed a report for a building society. Afterward, the complainants found cracks in the purchased property and sued the appraisers for their negligence. The court favored the complainants.
Yianni v Edwin Evans and Sons
Year
1981
Author
In-house law experts
Published
30 March 2019
Yewen v Noakes
The definition of an employee. A long time ago, there was immunity from taxation for the premises, occupied by servants. The premises in question were occupied by a clerk who earned 150 pounds per year and who obviously was not a servant. Immunity from taxes could not be applied in this case.
Yewen v Noakes
Year
1881
Author
In-house law experts
Published
02 November 2017
Yaxley v Gotts
Constructive trusts, proprietary estoppel. Yaxley had an oral deal with the accused person about the renovation of a house. The defendant refused to perform his obligations, claiming there was no parol contract. The Court favored the plaintiff, saying that the oral agreement was also valid.
Yaxley v Gotts
Year
2000
Author
In-house law experts
Published
27 September 2018
With v O’Flanagan
Misrepresentation. There were negotiations about buying the medical practice of the accused. When the agreement was due, the initial price of the practice was not the same as the initial one. The plaintiff wanted to repeal the contract but the Court held that the representation was correct. The Court of Appeal canceled the initial decision, stating that the accused was obliged to inform that the circumstances had changed.
With v O’Flanagan
Year
1936
Author
In-house law experts
Published
10 April 2019
Wollerton and Wilson Ltd v Richard Costain Ltd
Trespassing air space, pointless remedy. Richard Costain Ltd was involved in a project that used a crane. Its jib went 50 feet above the applicant’s house. The Court stated that as no harm was done, the only mean of legal remedy the applicant could have was an injunction to be provided as an answer to the fact of trespassing.
Wollerton and Wilson Ltd v Richard Costain Ltd
Year
1970
Author
In-house law experts
Published
03 May 2018
Wong v Parkside Health NHS Trust
Psychiatric harm, harassment, the intention of damage, assault. Ms Wong claimed to be a victim of harassment by M and two other employees of Parkside Health NHS Trust. She sued M for the intentional infliction of harm and she was awarded 75 pounds in damages for the common assault. In 1998, Ms Wong sued Parkside Health NHS Trus for physical and psychological harm but the Court rejected the appeal.
Wong v Parkside Health NHS Trust
Year
2001
Author
In-house law experts
Published
16 August 2017
Wooldridge v Sumner
Defence if volenti non fit injuria, tort, negligence, sports. A horse show photographer was standing on the ring where the performance was being held when the rider lost control over the horse which knocked a man down. The complainant accused the defendant of being careless. The Court said that it was the case of the complainant’s negligence during his work that caused risk.
Wooldridge v Sumner
Year
1963
Author
In-house law experts
Published
22 August 2016
Withers v Perry Chain Co Ltd
Duty of care. Ms Withers was employed by Perry Chain Co Ltd and suffered from dermatitis, as she worked with dangerous substances. She demanded compensation for damages. Her claim failed, as the employer had no duty of care to an adult employee who voluntarily agreed to work with dangerous substances.
Withers v Perry Chain Co Ltd
Year
1961
Author
In-house law experts
Published
14 October 2018
Winkworth v Edward Baron Development Co Ltd
Property, equitable interest. Mr and Mrs Wing managed the company that owned their house. The house was sold and the apartment the couple moved into belonged to their company as well. To mortgage it, Mr Wing forged the signature of his wife. The company went bankrupt and the complainant demanded the possession of the property. The Court stated that Mrs Wing had the dominant interest in the property but the Court of Appeal held that no interest in her property could be dominant. The mortgage was considered legal.
Winkworth v Edward Baron Development Co Ltd
Year
1986
Author
In-house law experts
Published
25 February 2018
Wyatt v KF
Pension award, business competition. The company Kreglinger and Fernau offered Mr Wyatt a pension reward with the condition that he would not work in wool trade. The former manager agreed for such indemnification. He received a pension for nine years but then the payments stopped. Mr Wyatt sued Kreglinger and Fernau but his requirement was proclaimed to have no legal force and Mr Wyatt lost the case.
Wyatt v KF
Year
1933
Author
In-house law experts
Published
11 June 2019
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