Significant cases you ought to know

Each case takes less than two minutes to read.
These two minutes will allow you to get better grades in your law classes.

Cases

The most meaningful cases

They became milestones in the Courts of England and Wales

Wright v Gibbons
Joint tenancy, real property, three joint tenants, two tenants cross-transferring. This is a story of three sisters who collectively owned real estate. Two of them reassigned their possession to each other so that the rental fee could become a common lease. When they died, the third sister tried to refute their assumption, stating that the co-rent lasted. But, the High Court ruled against her.
Wright v Gibbons
Year
1949
Author
In-house law experts
Published
13 May 2019
Wright v Lodge & Shepherd
Law of tort, liability, dangerous driving, negligence, contribution. Mr Lodge was driving his truck in a dangerous way and lost control over his vehicle. He injured Mr Wright, caused the death of one more person, and hit Ms Shepard’s Mini. Mr Lodge claimed that Ms Shepard was liable as well for the accident, as her car stood in the wrong place. The Court held that Ms Shepard should compensate only 10% of expenditures and only to her passenger.
Wright v Lodge & Shepherd
Year
1993
Author
In-house law experts
Published
07 January 2018
Yip Chiu Cheung v Regina
Mens rea, drug trafficking, conspiracy, criminal attempts. The appellant was accused of conspiracy with the intention of illegally trading drugs. The undercover officer was involved in the operation. Even though there is no doubt that the undercover officer had the best intentions and had no mens rea, the Court stated that the Crown cannot administrate and give sanctions to crimes.
Yip Chiu Cheung v Regina
Year
1994
Author
In-house law experts
Published
19 July 2018
Yianni v Edwin Evans and Sons
Duty of care, tort law, negligence. The complainants agreed on a loan when appraisers completed a report for a building society. Afterward, the complainants found cracks in the purchased property and sued the appraisers for their negligence. The court favored the complainants.
Yianni v Edwin Evans and Sons
Year
1981
Author
In-house law experts
Published
30 March 2019
Yewen v Noakes
The definition of an employee. A long time ago, there was immunity from taxation for the premises, occupied by servants. The premises in question were occupied by a clerk who earned 150 pounds per year and who obviously was not a servant. Immunity from taxes could not be applied in this case.
Yewen v Noakes
Year
1881
Author
In-house law experts
Published
02 November 2017
Yaxley v Gotts
Constructive trusts, proprietary estoppel. Yaxley had an oral deal with the accused person about the renovation of a house. The defendant refused to perform his obligations, claiming there was no parol contract. The Court favored the plaintiff, saying that the oral agreement was also valid.
Yaxley v Gotts
Year
2000
Author
In-house law experts
Published
27 September 2018
With v O’Flanagan
Misrepresentation. There were negotiations about buying the medical practice of the accused. When the agreement was due, the initial price of the practice was not the same as the initial one. The plaintiff wanted to repeal the contract but the Court held that the representation was correct. The Court of Appeal canceled the initial decision, stating that the accused was obliged to inform that the circumstances had changed.
With v O’Flanagan
Year
1936
Author
In-house law experts
Published
10 April 2019
Wollerton and Wilson Ltd v Richard Costain Ltd
Trespassing air space, pointless remedy. Richard Costain Ltd was involved in a project that used a crane. Its jib went 50 feet above the applicant’s house. The Court stated that as no harm was done, the only mean of legal remedy the applicant could have was an injunction to be provided as an answer to the fact of trespassing.
Wollerton and Wilson Ltd v Richard Costain Ltd
Year
1970
Author
In-house law experts
Published
03 May 2018
Wong v Parkside Health NHS Trust
Psychiatric harm, harassment, the intention of damage, assault. Ms Wong claimed to be a victim of harassment by M and two other employees of Parkside Health NHS Trust. She sued M for the intentional infliction of harm and she was awarded 75 pounds in damages for the common assault. In 1998, Ms Wong sued Parkside Health NHS Trus for physical and psychological harm but the Court rejected the appeal.
Wong v Parkside Health NHS Trust
Year
2001
Author
In-house law experts
Published
16 August 2017
Wooldridge v Sumner
Defence if volenti non fit injuria, tort, negligence, sports. A horse show photographer was standing on the ring where the performance was being held when the rider lost control over the horse which knocked a man down. The complainant accused the defendant of being careless. The Court said that it was the case of the complainant’s negligence during his work that caused risk.
Wooldridge v Sumner
Year
1963
Author
In-house law experts
Published
22 August 2016
Withers v Perry Chain Co Ltd
Duty of care. Ms Withers was employed by Perry Chain Co Ltd and suffered from dermatitis, as she worked with dangerous substances. She demanded compensation for damages. Her claim failed, as the employer had no duty of care to an adult employee who voluntarily agreed to work with dangerous substances.
Withers v Perry Chain Co Ltd
Year
1961
Author
In-house law experts
Published
14 October 2018
Winkworth v Edward Baron Development Co Ltd
Property, equitable interest. Mr and Mrs Wing managed the company that owned their house. The house was sold and the apartment the couple moved into belonged to their company as well. To mortgage it, Mr Wing forged the signature of his wife. The company went bankrupt and the complainant demanded the possession of the property. The Court stated that Mrs Wing had the dominant interest in the property but the Court of Appeal held that no interest in her property could be dominant. The mortgage was considered legal.
Winkworth v Edward Baron Development Co Ltd
Year
1986
Author
In-house law experts
Published
25 February 2018
Wyatt v KF
Pension award, business competition. The company Kreglinger and Fernau offered Mr Wyatt a pension reward with the condition that he would not work in wool trade. The former manager agreed for such indemnification. He received a pension for nine years but then the payments stopped. Mr Wyatt sued Kreglinger and Fernau but his requirement was proclaimed to have no legal force and Mr Wyatt lost the case.
Wyatt v KF
Year
1933
Author
In-house law experts
Published
11 June 2019
White & Carter (Councils) Ltd v McGregor
An agreement between a garage representative and an advertising service was held, however some mistakes were made during the negotiations. The complainant started a campaign even though it was cancelled and asked the defendant for payment via court.
White & Carter (Councils) Ltd v McGregor
Year
1962
Author
In-house law experts
Published
22 November 2017
Wheeler v New Merton Board Mills Ltd
A complainant cut his hand off with a dangerous tool. The employer said the worker knew the safety technique and it was his own responsibility to maintain it. The court stated that it is an employer’s obligation to guarantee its workers safety when working with potentially dangerous equipment.
Wheeler v New Merton Board Mills Ltd
Year
1993
Author
In-house law experts
Published
09 November 2018
Wheeler v Copas
Complaints were representatives of a building company and had a deal with a local farmer to build additional premises for him. In the course of the work, the farmer was asked to bring a ladder. It turned out to be broken which led to damages to the builders as the duty of care was broken.
Wheeler v Copas
Year
1981
Author
In-house law experts
Published
02 February 2019
Wheeldon vs Burrows
God bless electricity. Even though this case is about property law, it became possible because of a lack of electricity and small windows in a workplace in one part of a land, which was shielded by a building that emerged on the nearby part of a land which was sold to another owner.
Wheeldon vs Burrows
Year
1879
Author
In-house law experts
Published
17 October 2019
Wheat v E Lacon & Co Ltd
Duty of care occurred when a guest of an inn died on a badly-lit staircase. However, the owners of the building told guests that the staircase was dangerous and should be used with caution. The owners were not liable for the death of the guest.
Wheat v E Lacon & Co Ltd
Year
1966
Author
In-house law experts
Published
05 June 2019
WG Clark (Properties) Ltd v Dupre Properties Ltd
A tenant rented a basement from a landlord and wanted to rent a courtyard as well. However, they could not sign the agreement as it turned out that the landlord was not the land owner. The tenant sued the landlord and the landlord sued the owner.
WG Clark (Properties) Ltd v Dupre Properties Ltd
Year
1992
Author
In-house law experts
Published
04 March 2015
Westminster City Council v Clarke
A hostel for homeless people asked Mr. Clarke to leave as he did not fulfill his obligations of a resident. Mr. Clarke sued the hostel. The court stated there were no tenancy rights included in this case and the claim was dismissed.
Westminster City Council v Clarke
Year
1992
Author
In-house law experts
Published
21 September 2016
Wenkheim v Arndt
What a great idea to start one’s married life with a claim to a court. This is what Wenkheim and Arndt decided back in 1873 for legal action when the husband-to-be sued his future wife for the acceptance-denial of a marriage proposal misunderstanding.
Wenkheim v Arndt
Year
1873
Author
In-house law experts
Published
11 November 2018
Welton v North Cornwall District Council
Who should be claimed guilty if an officer made a mistake: an officer or a body of authority? This question arose when an environmental health officer gave a wrong piece of advice to Mr. Welton concerning his restaurant and guest house. The accusation of the officer on duty was considered dangerous in this situation, and the court stated that no duty of care should be applied.
Welton v North Cornwall District Council
Year
1997
Author
In-house law experts
Published
17 April 2019
Webb v Paternosters Case
When rent is a personal interest, the licence is a property right. This case was the first one to demonstrate that if there are no property rights, no licence can be enforced.
Webb v Paternosters Case
Year
1619
Author
In-house law experts
Published
19 November 2016
Watts v Morrow
The complainant hired an inspector to analyze the state of a house before the purchase. The inspector had not noticed a major problem that led to additional costs the buyer had to bear and to a claim for loss reimbursement.
Watts v Morrow
Year
1991
Author
In-house law experts
Published
23 October 2016
Watts and Ready v Story
The claimant moved to his grandmother to take care of her. He was promised that she would leave him her possessions. However, when the woman died, it turned out that her grandson got much less than he expected. He applied to the court to get a proprietary estoppel. Due to multiple factors, his claim was dismissed.
Watts and Ready v Story
Year
1984
Author
In-house law experts
Published
05 May 2018
Watt v Hertfordshire County Council
The applicant received an injury while performing his duties as a fireman and he sued the fire department for negligence. The court stated that even though the situation was not safe, it was the only way to perform a rescuing activity and a life saved counted higher than a limb injured.
Watt v Hertfordshire County Council
Year
1954
Author
In-house law experts
Published
03 November 2017
Watford Electronics Ltd v Sanderson CFL Ltd
The reasonableness of a limitation clause in respect to computer software was in question in this case. The court stated that a limitation clause is still liable in the kind of contract in question.
Watford Electronics Ltd v Sanderson CFL Ltd
Year
2001
Author
In-house law experts
Published
20 July 2017
Ward v London County Council
The complainant was injured in an accident caused by a firefighting truck that did not stop at a red light. The firemen were in a hurry but was there a case of influence of social usefulness on the standard of care? The vehicle’s driver was claimed liable for the complainant’s injuries.
Ward v London County Council
Year
1938
Author
In-house law experts
Published
23 September 2016
Woodrup v Nicol
This case talks about the quantification of damages. The complainant became a victim of a car accident and decided to use a private medical care which significantly increased the sum of reimbursement a defendant was due to pay. The choice of medical care service was questioned.
Woodrup v Nicol
Year
1991
Author
In-house law experts
Published
07 February 2017
Wilson v Tyneside Window Cleaning Co.
Mr. Wilson sued the company he worked for for neglecting its duties on guaranteeing safety to its workers which resulted in injuries to the applicant. The claim was rejected, as the company warned Mr. Wilson to implement his duties in a way that would not put him under unnecessary risk, which Mr. Wilson failed to do.
Wilson v Tyneside Window Cleaning Co.
Year
1958
Author
In-house law experts
Published
09 April 2016
Wilson v Lombank
Mr. Wilson brought legal action against the company he bought a vehicle from. The representative of Lombank took possession over the vehicle that belonged to Mr. Wilson by mistake when Mr. Wilson left the car in the garage where he had a credit line. The court proclaimed that this was an infringement of possession rights and obliged Lombank to pay a reimbursement to the applicant.
Wilson v Lombank
Year
1963
Author
In-house law experts
Published
26 March 2017
Wilson & Clyde co Ltd v English
The complainant died as the result of an accident in the workplace. His colleagues witnessed that he was careless and the accident was totally his fault. The defendant stated that there was an employee to whom safety duties were delegated and there was no liability of the company. The court made another decision.
Wilson & Clyde co Ltd v English
Year
1938
Author
In-house law experts
Published
05 May 2018
Wilsher v Essex Area Health Authority
The claimant stated that due to faulty acts of a junior doctor, an infant received problems with eyes. The first-instant court agreed that the hospital was liable as its actions increased risks for a child. However, the Court of Appeal proclaimed that as the claimant cannot prove that exactly the doctor’s actions caused the infant’s injuries, the hospital was not liable for the incident.
Wilsher v Essex Area Health Authority
Year
1988
Author
In-house law experts
Published
09 June 2015
Willis v Hoare
The applicant granted a sub-lease to the defendant and the latter thought that after the first sub-lease period, the next one would be offered. However, the applicant wished to take possession over the land. As the terms of the next sub-lease were not clear, the court decided in favor of the applicant.
Willis v Hoare
Year
1999
Author
In-house law experts
Published
10 October 2019
Williams v Roffey Bros & Nichols (Contractors) Ltd
Constructors had to perform their refurbishment work on time. They hired a carpenter and offered him a bonus if he finished his work on time. However, the worker did not get his additional wage and sued the contractors. The court stated that such promises must be fulfilled.
Williams v Roffey Bros & Nichols (Contractors) Ltd
Year
1991
Author
In-house law experts
Published
03 March 2017
Williams v Morgan
The defendant got a loan for land. The main debt was to be paid on the 1st of January, 1914. Also, an interest payment twice a year was due. When the interest was not paid on time, the applicant decided to gain possession over the land even though the initial debt was not due yet. The court dismissed the claim.
Williams v Morgan
Year
1906
Author
In-house law experts
Published
21 March 2016
Williams v Hensman
A mother left eight of her children a material fund that should have been paid to them as a will. One child took his part of the money with no claims from other children. However, this problem arose: how should this kind of property be treated?. The court proclaimed it to be a joint tenancy.
Williams v Hensman
Year
1861
Author
In-house law experts
Published
04 August 2017
Williams & Glyn’s Bank Ltd v Boland
Wives bought houses which became their spousal houses and later on, their husbands had pledged the houses on legal grounds. The court stated that the right of a wife to live in her house exceeds legal responsibility.
Williams & Glyn’s Bank Ltd v Boland
Year
1981
Author
In-house law experts
Published
06 June 2019
Wilkinson v Downton
A bad joke can create a lot of damage. Mr. Downtown told Mrs. Wilkinson one and caused her psychological damage. The complainant wanted to get compensation from the joker. However, as the case was based on mischief and injustice, there was no way to prove that the complainant suffered more than was expected.
Wilkinson v Downton
Year
1897
Author
In-house law experts
Published
01 January 2019
Wilkes v Spooner
There were two butchers who leased two shops nearby. They had a restrictive agreement: they would not become direct competitors with each other. However, when the lease to the shop went from Spooner to his son, the latter refused to fulfill this restrictive agreement. The court stated that the lease with the son did not bind him in the same way as his father.
Wilkes v Spooner
Year
1911
Author
In-house law experts
Published
24 October 2016
White v Bluett
The complainant sued the son of a deceased father and demanded the payment of a debt as it was agreed before the debtor’s death. However, the son claimed he had his own agreements with his father according to which the son was not liable for his father’s debts. The court stated their agreement was not legitimate and the debt was due.
White v Bluett
Year
1853
Author
In-house law experts
Published
11 August 2018
White and Others v Chief Constable of the South Yorkshire Police
The Hillsborough disaster after a football match resulted in multiple court cases and one of them was from policemen to the chief constable. The policemen accused the latter of psychiatric harm due to negligence, but as there was no risk of physical harm, the claim was dismissed.
White and Others v Chief Constable of the South Yorkshire Police
Year
1999
Author
In-house law experts
Published
23 August 2018
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